<html>
  <head>
    <meta content="text/html; charset=utf-8" http-equiv="Content-Type">
  </head>
  <body bgcolor="#FFFFFF" text="#000000">
    Yes, this is the right place.<br>
    As I started to say on that list, it seems to me that this may be a
    font-specific problem.<br>
    Fonts have hints. I've seen similar issues when the hints are poor.<br>
    Unfortunately there is no easy way to know if they are poor.<br>
    Some clients/apps/rendering systems by policy ignore hints so they
    may look OK,<br>
    but then they may not look as good on a case where the hints were
    good and important.<br>
    If I knew exactly what font you were using I could look at it.<br>
    <br>
    Note that Java 2D most definitely does use a fontrasteriser.<br>
    Oracle's builds use a one that ships with the JDK binaries (not
    source)<br>
    All openjdk builds use freetype. On Linux this means Ubuntu's
    openjdk will<br>
    use the exact same copy of freetype as used for rendering the rest
    of your desktop!<br>
    So if it looks bad with that, it will look bad on your desktop
    unless the font is interpreted differently.<br>
    I expect Android Studio uses the same platform freetype, and if you
    are using the same font<br>
    there that is why I think it may be down to hinting.<br>
    <br>
    I looked through all the fonts on 16.04 but didn't see a problem
    with "#"<br>
    So (off-list) email me the exact font and the size and rendering
    options you are using.<br>
    <br>
    -phil.<br>
    <br>
    <br>
    <div class="moz-cite-prefix">On 12/15/2016 05:30 AM, Artur Rataj
      wrote:<br>
    </div>
    <blockquote
cite="mid:CACO3_sAGEYO8j=4cjeku2=mOm=fH6TgAZPDLRPTC4G6-+9LxFg@mail.gmail.com"
      type="cite">
      <div dir="ltr">Hello, I discussed the problem on <span class=""
          id=":30g.1" tabindex="-1">dev</span>-build
        <div><br>
        </div>
        <div><a moz-do-not-send="true" href="http://mail">http://mail</a>.<span
            class="" id=":30g.2" tabindex="-1">openjdk</span>.<a
            moz-do-not-send="true" href="http://java.net/">java.net/</a><span
            class="" id=":30g.3" tabindex="-1">pipermail</span>/build-<span
            class="" id=":30g.4" tabindex="-1">dev</span>/2016-December/018353.html<br>
        </div>
        <div><br>
        </div>
        <div>but have been redirected here, thanks Eric!</div>
        <div><br>
        </div>
        <div>I would like to ask why <span class="" id=":30g.5"
            tabindex="-1">OpenJDK</span> on Linux has by default an
          inferior font rendering quality, when there are <span
            class="" id=":30g.6" tabindex="-1">OpenJDK</span> variants
          also for <span class="" id=":30g.7" tabindex="-1">Linux</span>¬†which
          can render the same fonts with a very high quality.</div>
        <div><br>
        </div>
        <div>I described the problem in more detail and with images
          here:</div>
        <div><br>
        </div>
        <div><a class="moz-txt-link-freetext" href="https://">https://</a><span class="" id=":30g.8" tabindex="-1">stackoverflow</span>.com/questions/41149451/a-method-of-getting-a-<span
            class="" id=":30g.9" tabindex="-1">linux</span>-<span
            class="" id=":30g.10" tabindex="-1">jdk</span>-tarball-with-<span
            class="" id=":30g.11" tabindex="-1">freetype</span>-like-font-rendering<br>
        </div>
        <div><br>
        </div>
        <div>Best regards,</div>
        <div>Artur</div>
        <div><br>
        </div>
      </div>
    </blockquote>
    <br>
  </body>
</html>